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Somali hip-hop group brings anti-terrorism message

 
The Bulletin
By Jenna Ross / Star Tribune (Minneapolis)
Saturday, October 29, 2016
http://www.hiiraan.com/images/2016/Oct/20161029636133591238817786Hip_Hop_Somalia_660_1.jpg
Musician Jeremy Ylvisaker lets 8-year-old Samir Muse try his guitar. Mark Vancleave / Minneapolis Star Tribune

MINNEAPOLIS — In a classroom in the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood of Minneapolis, members of the Somali hip-hop group Waayaha Cusub started singing.
A few boys tumbled into the room, then grew quiet as the men harmonized in Somali, patting on drums. A 10-year-old named Hamze grabbed a djembe drum, balanced it atop his basketball and began playing along.
This hip-hop collective has held concerts in Nairobi’s most dangerous neighborhoods and even staged a massive music festival in Somalia’s war-torn capital, Mogadishu. In those cities, Waayaha Cusub risked bullets and bombs to perform for young people, using lyrics to steer the kids away from extremism and toward peace.
This month, the refugee rappers and singers have brought that message to Minnesota — where there’s far less risk but still great need, its members say.
“If you look at the youth who have joined Al-Shabab, Al-Qaida, ISIS, most of these youth are from the Western world,” said Shiine Akhyaar Ali, one of the group’s rappers and its manager, through a translator. “They’re seeing the wrong messages. And the reason we’re here is to send them the right messages.
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Artist Dalmar Yare leads kids in a song his group will perform with workshop participants.
 
Mark Vancleave / Minneapolis Star Tribune

“Stay away from violence, from extremism, from drugs because Somalia’s waiting for you to lead.”
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Waayaha Cusub, which means “new era,” gathered here as part of a program aimed at increasing understanding of Muslim culture through music. As part of its monthlong stay, the group will perform in Minneapolis — at the Cedar Cultural Center on Saturday — and in outstate Minnesota, in cities with growing Somali populations and, in some cases, tensions. Mankato is next, then St. Cloud, where one of Waayaha Cusub’s original members, Dalmar Yare, now lives.
Led by the Cedar Cultural Center, the program, called Midnimo, is also putting the musicians in the classroom. They’ve improvised with students at Augsburg College and played with middle-schoolers at the Brian Coyle Community Center, teaching them their anthems and helping the students fashion their own songs.
Waayaha Cusub was formed in 2002 in Kenya, where its members had moved as children to escape Somalia’s conflict. Because they are now scattered across the globe — unable to return to Kenya — bringing the musicians here was tricky. So tricky, in fact, that one of its lead singers didn’t make it.
Falis Abdi Mohamud’s face is featured at the top of the band’s posters, bathed in light. In 2014, Mohamud, who is married to Ali, and the other performers gathered in Amsterdam, where they began recording a new album, “Nabad Waa Muhim” or “Peace Is Vital.” But on their way out of Nairobi, officials seized their refugee cards, Ali said, revoking their residencies. The couple’s three children — the youngest was 11/2 years old at the time — stayed in Kenya with relatives.
Mohamud was granted asylum in Amsterdam and worked to bring their children there. A month ago, she got word: They would be reunited.
But two of the children got sick and were hospitalized, and Mohamud couldn’t care for her three children, plus three family members’ kids, in a small apartment. So she and the children landed in a Rotterdam refugee camp.
As he told the story, Ali squeezed the space between his forehead and his temple. “I am in touch with her every day,” he said. “I can feel the pain that she’s going through.”
In a note on Facebook, Cedar executive director Adrienne Dorn wrote: “It’s hard to see this incredible group face such obstacles. But for many of the artists that we present as part of Midnimo, challenges like this continue to impact their lives and art form.”
On a recent Friday afternoon, Ali and two other performers — Lihle “Six Fingers” Muhdin and Dikriyo Abdi - rehearsed on the Cedar’s stage. Between songs, they spoke in rapid Somali and then, in halting English, traded notes with Minnesota musicians who are serving as their backing band.
“Do you like that groove?” asked drummer Joey Van Phillips, who plays with Dessa.
“Yeah, that’s good,” Abdi said, nodding.
In recent weeks, this group of musicians has gone to classrooms together, communicating with students in varied ways. In a class at Augsburg, students watched a short video about Waayaha Cusub before asking its members questions. Then they all played music together.
“They were having to speak through a translator, and yet when they started to improvise, everybody knew 4/4 time, everybody knew pentatonic scales,” said Jill Dawe, an associate professor of piano. The experience demonstrated something she often mentions: Music is a culturally specific and universal language, she said. “It broke the ice in the room, in a way.”
In class, conversations delved into musical specifics but also politics. After the band talked about using music and poetry to engage young people, Dawe asked her students if they’ve ever used music to solve a community problem.
Waayaha Cusub’s lyrics address AIDS, circumcision, women’s rights and love. But the group has became internationally known for tackling extremism.
Warlords, at first. Then, in a 2010 song, the musicians pointed to the terrorist group Al-Shabab, a growing presence in Eastleigh, their neighborhood in Nairobi. “Be aware — this is the enemy living within you, this is educating your kids and your youth about how extremism is the way,” Ali said via a translator.
“Shocked, shocked. Who is behind this trail of destruction? Al-Shabab,” Ali raps in Somali on “Yaabka al Shabaab,” or “The Terrible Al-Shabab.” “They galvanize people on the street for their wicked cause. They profess to be pious but wield machetes.”



 Songstress Achieng Abura dies at Kenyatta National Hospita

By Caroline Nyanga Updated Fri, October 21st 2016 at 00:13 GMT +3 SHARE THIS ARTICLE Songbird Achieng Abura. (Photo: Courtesy) Nairobi: A United Afro Jazz musician and former Tusker Project Fame Principal Achieng Abura has died. She passed on Thursday at the Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH). Ms Abura was admitted at KNH’s private wing on October 13 and was undergoing treatment for undisclosed illness.

 She passed on at around 6pm. Early this month, the artiste through her social media page indicated that her health was not good, and that doctors had advised her to gain more weight, then lose it through exercising. A close family source revealed that the musician had been transferred to I CU after her condition worsened.

On Wednesday, fellow songbird and friend Suzzana Owiyo had paid her a visit and described her condition as unstable. “It is unfortunate that we have lost one of the local greatest talent. May God rest her soul in peace,” said Ms Owiyo from Mombasa. Benga queen, Princess Jully, described Abura’s death as shocking.

 “The gap she has left will never be filled. She has died at a time when her sickling son needs her most. Indeed death is cruel,” she said. READ MORE KNH nurses charged with death of cancer patient Nurses protest arrest of two colleagues over patient’s death Kenya joins the globe to mark mental health day Abura leaves behind a 10-year old son who is suffering from sickle cell. Abura mostly performed afro-jazz, afro-fusion and gospel music. She debuted into the music industry in the early 1990 with a gospel album ‘I Believe’. Her following albums were ‘Way Over Yonder’ and ‘Sulwe’.

 She won the Kora Award in 2004 for Best East African Female artiste. She later became a UNDP Goodwill ambassador. She acted as principal of East African reality TV show, ‘Tusker Project Fame’ and was among the Kenyan artistes who have been sponsored by the Alliance Francaise. She was born in Eldoret and holds a MSc. degree in Philosophy and Environmental studies. We, at Standard Digital, condole with the family during this trying momen



Somali Sister Duo Faarrow Is ‘Chasing Highs’ In Their New Music Video

Sisters Iman and Siham Hashi, better known as Faarrow, are back with a soaring new video for “Chasing Highs,” the latest single from their Lost EP.

The duo sing from the top of cliffs at Yosemite National Park and city rooftops in the new clip for the song, which they mention is “about someone going to extreme measures just to feel alive.”
“Chasing Highs” actually came to life during sessions in which the sisters were writing a song Rihanna.
Siham mentions, “our producer and co-writer Elijah Kelley had the idea; we were writing lyrics about someone going to extreme measures just to feel alive and the three of us were all coming from different perspectives. Some of us were speaking in terms of a relationship and others about fulfilling our dreams.”
“On the journey to finding yourself and growing into the person you want to be, sometimes you’re chasing so many highs trying to fill a void, whether it’s a person or a goal,” adds Iman. “For all three of us, it was something we were all feeling: not knowing what’s next but still passionately chasing our dreams; not having what we want and sometimes doing extreme things to feel something.”
Iman and Siham, whose names in Arabic mean “faith” and “arrow” respectively (hence Faarrow), are currently working on their first full-length album.
Their latest EP Lost features “Chasing Highs,” its girl anthem title-track and “Shut Up,” which curiously has Zac Efron singing on the hook.
Watch the James McCloud-directed video above.
tags faarrow, iman hashi, lost ep, siham hashi


Singing helps one to reduce anxiety

At Easleighwood we know that through Singing, our talented youths can develop skills to speak in a natural, powerful and confident voice that at the end they will be able to represent the society in addressing issues of concern. Music can improve your ability to use your speaking voice with more clarity and confidence. Singing helps one to reduce anxiety, thus helping you overcome your fear of public speaking.

Music is a great healer because when we listen to music depending on the occasion especially happy times, it ensures physical, mental, psychological and social wellbeing of the listeners. Music will definitely stimulate your brain even in sad moments, enhance your mental awareness, concentration and alleviates depression.
There is more about music, and that’s why we always give youths a chance to showcase their talents, through nurturing their talents in music, they will be able to have sense of belonging. Music is a source of communication because through this we can pass a message of peace to the listeners.

Music is used as way to nurture the talents 

 Music is used as way to nurture the talents of upcoming youths by showcasing their talents and recording them in our studios thereby helping them explore by selling their song copies as a way of earning a living. In this case you will learn that most youths have talents but they have no chances of showcasing them. Eastleighwood has taken the initiative to help them nurture their talents and even with publicity. Come explore your talents at Eastleighwood and explore more on what you know most and this will help you more in your living at large.


our talented youths can develop music skills through our Battle Zone

our talented youths can develop skills to speak in a natural, powerful and confident voice that at the end they will be able to represent the society in addressing issues of concern. Music can improve your ability to use your speaking voice with more clarity and confidence. Music is a great healer because when we listen to music depending on the occasion especially happy times, it ensures physical, mental, psychological and social wellbeing of the listeners. Music will definitely stimulate your brain even in sad moments, enhance your mental awareness, concentration and alleviates depression.


Objectives of Music

To express and modulate emotions. To soothe, psych up, woo, enrage, sadden and cheer each other, or ourselves. To bring people together, to encourage creativity, to relieve stress and making transition easier and that’s why Eastleighwood has a studio that enables youths record their songs and also hosts talent show where all youths come together to show case their talent and improve more on the purpose of music in their lives.


Music is mostly used in day to day life


Music is mostly used in day to day life. Eastleighwood is offering training course of the willing participants on how to play piano, violin and guitar. It’s such a great moment where the involved students in the training will have equipped skills that will help them improve on their ways of living. Don’t miss this training for those interested, come and experience in Eastleighwood.


Eastleighwood Music skills

At Easleighwood we know that through Singing, our talented youths can develop skills to speak in a natural, powerful and confident voice that at the end they will be able to represent the society in addressing issues of concern. Music can improve your ability to use your speaking voice with more clarity and confidence. Singing helps one to reduce anxiety, thus helping you overcome your fear of public speaking.

Music is a great healer because when we listen to music depending on the occasion especially happy times, it ensures physical, mental, psychological and social wellbeing of the listeners. Music will definitely stimulate your brain even in sad moments, enhance your mental awareness, concentration and alleviates depression.
There is more about music, and that’s why we always give youths a chance to showcase their talents, through nurturing their talents in music, they will be able to have sense of belonging. Music is a source of communication because through this we can pass a message of peace to the listeners.

Eastleighwood Music

At Eastleighwood, we understand that even as people think of their worries and problems they would want to be listening to some hot new music wherever they are, that’s why even in our daily lives we play music for different reasons and at different times. You have heard in shops, gyms, streets people playing different kind s of music even some therapists do encourage their patients to listen to music as a way of relaxation.
Nowadays music is everywhere as it’s played and listened anywhere ,some people play music even when they are taking a shower, it changes a bad mood to a good and more relaxing mood especially those songs that touch our lives and what we are undergoing at that moment.
People have different opinions on the type of music played; some will view it as a source of encouragement while others will think it some form of comedy because music means different things to many people, however listen to the right kind of music at sometimes will sooth you and wash all the worries thus preparing you for another new night or day.
To many music is healing, I don’t want to think how life would be without music!

Eastleighwood has  a studio, record your songs 

Eastleighwood has  a studio that artist, come to record their items like recording their songs, spoken words and even poems, among many items that can be recorded in the studio. Most of the clients involved in recording their items in our studio feel empowered with artistic skills through their recorded  items that helps them to sell and help them cope with this harsh economic times. Through their presentations it helps them to gain their self esteem, self confidence, improving on their psychosocial life.Music helps to break  all division of races , religion and cultures among different communities. Its a good idea since it makes an establishes brotherhood in the society and communities at large. Music is life lets all enjoy it by recording at Eastleighwood studio to improve our ways of life with Music


All musicians nurture their talents

All musicians nurture their talents and use it too 

s a way earning a living.  Music as a talent is an innate ability to identify pitch (i.e. imitate pitch with precision), precise rhythmic ability intense in a variety of music and an ability to learn and express music through rote methods (recognition and imitation).Although early intervention and instruction are not necessarily for developing music talent, they appear to be significant factors in determining an individual’s full realization of musical gift. In Eastleighwood we nurture music talents any individual who visits our office to record their music items and come up with a final copy of their music version where they sell them to the funs to listen to them and thus helps them earn a living. Generally this has empowered most of the artists who visit our offices to record their items in the studio. This indicates that exceptional musical abilities are often acquired through optimal environmental conditions and the important contributing factors include; self motivation through extensive support from family members, mentors, appropriate resources (instruments, music lessons and exposure to musical activities and practice trainings. Eastleighwood facilitates musical development in their children by recognizing how and when to encourage, reinforce skills and concepts that are already developing naturally among the youths upcoming artists. Music speaks what cannot be expressed, soothes the mind and gives it rest, heals the heart and makes it whole flows to the soul. Finally music is a moral law. Music is a way of life. 


Somali Musical Style


The music of Somalia refers to the musical styles, techniques and sounds of Somalia.

Somalia has a rich musical heritage centered on traditional Somali folklore. Most Somali songs are pentatonic. That is, they only use five pitches per octave in contrast to a heptatonic (seven notes) scale such as the major scale. At first listen, Somali music might be mistaken for the sounds of nearby regions such as Ethiopia, Sudan or Arabia, but it is ultimately recognizable by its own unique tunes and styles. Somali songs are usually the product of collaboration between lyricists (midho),songwriters (lahan), and vocalists ('odka or "voice"). The first major form of modern Somali music began in the mid-1930s, when northwestern Somalia was a part of the British. This style of music was known as dhaanto, an innovative, urban form of Somali folk dance and song. This period also saw the rise of the Haji Bal Bal Dance Troupe, which became very influential over the course of its long career. Somali popular music began with the balwo style, which was created by Abdi Sinimo. This style began in Dilla, and then spread throughout the area. It was a mixture of modern poetry and Somali dance music.Abdullahi Qarshe rose to fame in the early 1940s as part of the qaraami style. Many qaraami songs from this era are still extremely popular today. This musical style is mostly played on the kaban (oud). Prominent Somali kaban players of the 1950s include Ali Feiruz and Mohamed Nahari.

During the Siad Barre regime, music was suppressed except for a small amount of officially-sanctioned music. There were many protest songs produced during this period.


Eastleighwood Studio

We transform the community through sustainable music, arts, media, film and video production ventures
That is why we established Eastleighwood ultra-modern studio as a plan to support youth trainings in music production and recording, we specialize on providing the best for our clients both in west landsEastlands regions in Nairobi and beyond.Every Saturday we have battlezone where we reward the winners by recording an album for free
We give the best because we believe the clients are the key to success, we dream to have big Ewood band with youths earning their lives through music production. Come join us, be one of the big team
As we expose your talent with passion

At Eastleighwood we give opportunity to upcoming artists

                                                                                                           At
Eastleighwood we give opportunity to upcoming artists and also talented individuals in singing. We come up with the Battle Zone Event Every Saturday from 12pm to 2pm.It’s always an open mic whereby we welcome everyone to expose his or her talent  whether it’s fast rhythm or slow rhythm.
The type of music does not matter because we also give room to African music from the dhaanto dancers which is a style of traditional Somali music and folk dance. We believe music as a talent can take you far and that’s why, we established Eastleighwood Ultra-Modern Studio to support our youth trainings in music production because after the training, they can earn a living through the skills gained.
We give our talented youths in music an opportunity to perform during our interactive forums which always give them morale and hope to continue nurturing their talent. Many of them get exposure to the public as people get to listen to their music.
It’s always an open forum, visit our offices and get to learn about our programs, you will never want to miss them.

Eastleighwood Music

 
Music is a fundamental to being able to discuss, categorize, and otherwise consider the phenomenon of what we understand as being music. Creative mind has the ability to make discoveries and create innovations.Listenignto instrumental music challenges one to listen and tell a story about one hears.I n the same sense, playing and singing music gives the ability to tell  stories without wordsand they require maximum right brain usage which not only exercises ones creativity but also ones interllectuals.The strength of all the Arts done in Eastleighwood Writing, talent show (battle Zone) programs have the ability to create the similar effect.It can create the mood and makes one feel emotional.Music has the power to suggest movement.In developing our talents itsmusic indicates that exceptional musical abilities are often acquired through optimal environment conditions and likely to be a studio where impotant contributing factors include self motivation in regard to what we we run the battle zone program  for talent show and our extensive support from Eastleighwood.We facilitate nusical development with our studio where clients come to records their items with us most likely music, spoken word  and any other exposure to musical activities by encouraging, reinforcing skills and concepts that will hel them nurture their talents through music. Everyone has a God given talent whatever His exceptional gift is- dancing,writing,acting,arts,singing or playing an instrument nurture it well


Qali Ladhan,2013 youngest Somali Superstar Singer

Qaali Ladan
Qaali Ladan Is a Somali super star Singer, she was born in in Moqadishu Somali, and grew up in Kenya coast side Mombassa, she currently lives in the capital City of Kenya Nairobi with her husband and her family.
she is married to her fellow singer Libaan JigJiga
in the year 2013 she was awarded the youngest Somali Singer .
she released a number of Albums, with her incredible voice it’s not a surprise




Taylor Swift & Kanye West Kiss And Make Up At The Grammys While Kim Kardashian Proudly Watches

Six years after Kanye West infamously interrupted Taylor Swift's acceptance speech at the MTV VMAs, it looks like the water is officially under the bridge!
The former feuding pair were spotted making nice while Kim Kardashian West looked on with pride!
Maybe Tay-Tay was congratulating Yeezy on his performance or his gorgeous but elusive smile.
Either way, it looks like there are no more hard feelings!
Amaal Nuux Somali-Canadian Singer & Song writer 
Amaal Nuux is a Somali-Canadian singer-songwriter. Based in Toronto, her music is noted for its socially conscious themes. She sings in a variety of genres, including pop, alternative rock and r&b.
Amaal Nuux was born between 1985 and 1987 in Mogadishu, Somalia. She was raised in a traditional Muslim household, the middle child of seven sisters and two brothers.
When the civil war broke out in Somalia in 1991, Nuux and her family immigrated to Toronto, Canada.
Nuux got immersed in art early on. She began singing at the age of 14, having been exposed to music at school as well as drama classes.
Nuux later returned to Somalia on her parent's insistence to strengthen her ties with her native culture. She describes her time there as seminal, having allowed her to grow as a person and hone her artistic craft.
Nuux's music is diverse, ranging from pop, to alternative rock, to r&b. The diversity is a reflection of her personal belief that an artist should be capable of performing all types of music

Faarrow (Musician)


Faarrow is a duo comprised of Siham and Iman, two sisters from Canada Originally signed to Motown Universal, Faarrow are now with Warner Brother Records creating music that fuses their pop sensibilities with their Somali roots. Their album is slated to come before the end of the year

K'naan

KEINAN ABDI WARSAME, Somalia Canadian poet, Rapper, Singer, Songwriter and Instrumentalist
K'naan was born in 1978 in Mogadishu, situated in the southeastern Banaadir province of Somalia. He hails from the Hawiye clan.K'naan's family was from an artistic background. His grandfather was a famous poet, and his aunt Magool was a renowned singer.
K'naan spent his childhood in the national capital, Mogadishu.[6 His father, Abdi, had left earlier when he was still a boy to work as a taxi driver in New York City. K’naan’s early years were idyllic and enveloped in poetry and song, with his aunt Magool often singing to him. This changed following the start of the civil war, when at the age of 12; three of his friends were shot by an older adolescent gunman. K’naan also narrowly escaped death one day at his school, when he mistook a grenade that he had found in the dirt for a potato and threw it away just before it detonated. These incidents and the general escalation in violence prompted his mother to seek a visa so that the family could rejoin his father in New York. At the age of 13, K'naan and his mother and two siblings, older brother Liban and younger sister Sagal, subsequently moved to the United States. They stayed in New York for half a year before relocating to Toronto, Canada, where K'naan's dad had settled. His family still resides there.
In his new environment, K'naan began learning English, partly by listening to hip hop albums by artists like Nas and Rakim. Despite the fact that he could not yet speak the language, he taught himself hip-hop and rap diction, copying the lyrics and style phonetically.He then also began rapping. While growing up in the Rexdale neighborhood, K'naan lost many friends to murder, suicide, prison and deportation
K'naan was briefly married to Deqa, a pharmacy technician, with whom he has two sons, born in 2005 and 2007. They divorced before he started touring for the 2010 FIFA World Cup with Coca-Cola.
Career
K'naan became a friend and associate of Canadian promoter Sol Guy, who helped him secure a speaking engagement before the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in 1999, where K'naan performed a spoken word piece criticizing the UN for its failed peacekeeping missions to Somalia.[16] One of the audience members, Senegalese singer Youssou N'Dour, was so impressed by the young MC's performance and courage that he invited him to contribute to his 2001 album Building Bridges, a project through which K'naan was able to tour the world.
This project led to his work at other UN events, as well as the Montreal Jazz Festival and the Halifax Pop Explosion. It also helped him meet Canadian producer Brian West and Jarvis Church and his Track & Field team in 2002, who produced his debut album The Dusty Foot Philosopher, which was released in 2005 to critical acclaim. In 2006, it won the Juno Award for Rap Recording of the Year, and was nominated for the 2006 Polaris Music Prize. It also won the BBC Radio 3 Award for World Music in the newcomer category for 2007.[17][18] The Dusty Foot Philosopher was re-released and repackaged as a "Deluxe Edition" featuring new mixes and a bonus DVD in the United States (and various international territories) by the emerging media company and record label iM (Interdependent Media, Inc.) in 2008
K'naan toured and collaborated with artists like Nelly Furtado, Mos Def, will.i.am, The Roots, Dead Prez, and Pharoahe Monch on tours such as Live and Breedlove Odyssey.He also collaborated with Damian Marley on the "Welcome to Jamrock" touring session.

K'naan released The Dusty Foot on the Road, a collection of recordings made during his world tour on Wrasse Records.
K'naan rose to mainstream popularity by participating in the 2008 BET Awards Cypher. This was his first appearance on American television. His second studio album, Troubadour, was released on 24 February 2009 on A&M/Octone Records, and distributed through Universal Music Group worldwide. The album's first single, "ABC's", was released in late 2008. K'naan's music has featured in several video games such as Madden NFL 09 (with his song "ABC's") and FIFA 06 (with his song "Soobax"). The song "If Rap Gets Jealous", a re-recording of a track of the same name – with different verses – from The Dusty Foot Philosopher, features Metallica lead guitarist Kirk Hammett. K'naan was also the first featured artist on X3, a collaborative project between CBC Radio 3, Exclaim! Magazine and aux.tv to promote new Canadian music. In July 2010, he performed a cover of U2's "Stuck in a Moment You Can't Get Out Of" for iheartradio.In 24 January 2012, K'naan released a 5 song EP under the title More Beautiful Than Silence including songs such as "Nothing to Lose", "Better", "Is Anybody Out There?". The songs also include collaborations with Nas and Nelly Furtado.

K'naan's 2012 album, Country, God or the Girl, was met with little of the critical acclaim and success that Troubadour had received. Unlike Troubadour, which was produced almost entirely by production team Track and Field, Country, God or the Girl featured a wide range of different producers, many of whom work on more mainstream projects. After the release of the album, K'naan published an article in the New York Times explaining and apologizing for the change in his sound. "My lyrics should change, my label's executives said; radio programmers avoid subjects too far from fun and self-absorption," recounts K'naan. "So I began to say yes. Yes to trying out songs with A-list producers. Yes to moving production from Kingston to Los Angeles." In the end, K'naan states "I had not made my Marley or my Dylan, or even my K'naan; I had made an album in which a few genuine songs are all but drowned out by the loud siren of ambition. Fatima had become Mary, and Mohamed, Adam."

In 2012, K'naan published a children's book, When I Get Old


Maya Jama[Presenter]

As the host of MTV’s The Wrap UpMaya Jama is the first ever Somali VJ, though before the fame she was a quirky presenter for many hip-hop publications and stations




Ifrah Mansour [Artist/Performer]

Ifrah Mansour is an interdisciplinary mixed media artist and performer. While her work is not well known, she’s made a name for herself in the theater world, establishing herself as a formidable costume designer and actress in many staged productions. As an environmentally conscious performer, Ifrah’s performances almost always includes recycled fashions

'American Idol' Recap: Wide Awake in San Francisco


From the moment American Idol showcased Mustafa, the psychic cat of contestant Katharine Skitter, in a preview package, the immediate premonition was that the San Francisco auditions would be magical.
And they were.
From Skitter's fabulously wacky audition in a fur coat the 15-year old insisted was given to her by one Mr. David Bowie (that story alone must have gotten her that golden ticket), to another hilarious montage of contestants failing to exit the room and a close up of judge Harry Connick Jr.'s  impressive "guns" after he raced Olympian Ryan Bailey, Wednesday night's episodes was incredibly fun, and felt way too short.
Plus, how can the show go wrong when the race between Connick and Bailey featured Season 10 alum Haley Reinhart's song, "Hit the Ground Running" as its background soundtrack?
                                                                          By , The Hollywood Reporter

 comments


Music can do more than just lifting your spirit:
1. CHRONIC BACK PAIN
Music works on the autonomic nervous system - the part of the nervous system responsible for controlling our blood pressure, heartbeat and brain function - and also the limbic system - the part of the brain that controls feelings and emotions. These systems react sensitively to music.
When slow rhythms are played, our blood pressure and heartbeat slow down which helps us breathe more slowly, thus reducing muscle tension in our neck, shoulders, stomach and back. But also apart from physical tension, music also reduces psychological tension in our mind.
In other words when we feel pain, we become frightened, frustrated and angry which makes us tense up hundreds of muscles in our back. Listening to music on a regular basis helps our bodies relax physically and mentally, thus helping to relieve - and prevent - back pain.
 'Music is an important part of our physical and emotional wellbeing - ever since we were babies in our mother's womb listening to her heartbeat and breathing rhythms. 'Listening to music for about 25 minutes every day for at least ten days can help prevent back pain and also make you sleep better.
Which type of music is best? Any type of classical music can help relieve muscle pain. Calm, slow music is also thought to help.
2. IMPROVES YOUR WORKOUT
How it helps: listening to music during exercise can give you a better workout in several ways. It can increase your endurance, boostyour mood and can distract you from any discomfort experienced because, music releases endorphins - our natural 'feel good' hormones that lift our mood and give us motivation to carry on longer with exercise during your workout.
Which type of music is best? The best type of music for exercise is thought to be high energy, high tempo music such as hip hop or dance music.
3. MEMORY LOSS
How it helps: For many people suffering from memory loss the spoken language has become meaningless. Music can help patients remember tunes or songs and get in touch with their history. This is because the part of the brain which processes music is located next to memory. People with memory loss however respond best to music of their choice. LETS GIVE MORE TO MUSICWHY MUSIC IS THE KEY TO GOOD HEALTH
Music can do more than just lifting your spirit:
1. CHRONIC BACK PAIN
Music works on the autonomic nervous system - the part of the nervous system responsible for controlling our blood pressure, heartbeat and brain function - and also the limbic system - the part of the brain that controls feelings and emotions. These systems react sensitively to music.
When slow rhythms are played, our blood pressure and heartbeat slow down which helps us breathe more slowly, thus reducing muscle tension in our neck, shoulders, stomach and back. But also apart from physical tension, music also reduces psychological tension in our mind.
In other words when we feel pain, we become frightened, frustrated and angry which makes us tense up hundreds of muscles in our back. Listening to music on a regular basis helps our bodies relax physically and mentally, thus helping to relieve - and prevent - back pain.
 'Music is an important part of our physical and emotional wellbeing - ever since we were babies in our mother's womb listening to her heartbeat and breathing rhythms. 'Listening to music for about 25 minutes every day for at least ten days can help prevent back pain and also make you sleep better.
Which type of music is best? Any type of classical music can help relieve muscle pain. Calm, slow music is also thought to help.
2. IMPROVES YOUR WORKOUT
How it helps: listening to music during exercise can give you a better workout in several ways. It can increase your endurance, boost your mood and can distract you from any discomfort experienced because, music releases endorphins - our natural 'feel good' hormones that lift our mood and give us motivation to carry on longer with exercise during your workout.
Which type of music is best? The best type of music for exercise is thought to be high energy, high tempo music such as hip hop or dance music.
3. MEMORY LOSS
How it helps: For many people suffering from memory loss the spoken language has become meaningless. Music can help patients remember tunes or songs and get in touch with their history. This is because the part of the brain which processes music is located next to memory. People with memory loss however respond best to music of their choice. LETS GIVE MORE TO MUSICWHY MUSIC IS THE KEY TO GOOD HEALTH
Music can do more than just lifting your spirit:
1. CHRONIC BACK PAIN
Music works on the autonomic nervous system - the part of the nervous system responsible for controlling our blood pressure, heartbeat and brain function - and also the limbic system - the part of the brain that controls feelings and emotions. These systems react sensitively to music.
When slow rhythms are played, our blood pressure and heartbeat slow down which helps us breathe more slowly, thus reducing muscle tension in our neck, shoulders, stomach and back. But also apart from physical tension, music also reduces psychological tension in our mind.
In other words when we feel pain, we become frightened, frustrated and angry which makes us tense up hundreds of muscles in our back. Listening to music on a regular basis helps our bodies relax physically and mentally, thus helping to relieve - and prevent - back pain.
 'Music is an important part of our physical and emotional wellbeing - ever since we were babies in our mother's womb listening to her heartbeat and breathing rhythms. 'Listening to music for about 25 minutes every day for at least ten days can help prevent back pain and also make you sleep better.
Which type of music is best? Any type of classical music can help relieve muscle pain. Calm, slow music is also thought to help.
2. IMPROVES YOUR WORKOUT
How it helps: listening to music during exercise can give you a better workout in several ways. It can increase your endurance, boost your mood and can distract you from any discomfort experienced because, music releases endorphins - our natural 'feel good' hormones that lift our mood and give us motivation to carry on longer with exercise during your workout.
Which type of music is best? The best type of music for exercise is thought to be high energy, high tempo music such as hip hop or dance music.
3. MEMORY LOSS
How it helps: For many people suffering from memory loss the spoken language has become meaningless. Music can help patients remember tunes or songs and get in touch with their history. This is because the part of the brain which processes music is located next to memory. People with memory loss however respond best to music of their choice. LETS GIVE MORE TO MUSICWHY MUSIC IS THE KEY TO GOOD HEALTH
Music can do more than just lifting your spirit:
1. CHRONIC BACK PAIN
Music works on the autonomic nervous system - the part of the nervous system responsible for controlling our blood pressure, heartbeat and brain function - and also the limbic system - the part of the brain that controls feelings and emotions. These systems react sensitively to music.
When slow rhythms are played, our blood pressure and heartbeat slow down which helps us breathe more slowly, thus reducing muscle tension in our neck, shoulders, stomach and back. But also apart from physical tension, music also reduces psychological tension in our mind.
In other words when we feel pain, we become frightened, frustrated and angry which makes us tense up hundreds of muscles in our back. Listening to music on a regular basis helps our bodies relax physically and mentally, thus helping to relieve - and prevent - back pain.
 'Music is an important part of our physical and emotional wellbeing - ever since we were babies in our mother's womb listening to her heartbeat and breathing rhythms. 'Listening to music for about 25 minutes every day for at least ten days can help prevent back pain and also make you sleep better.
Which type of music is best? Any type of classical music can help relieve muscle pain. Calm, slow music is also thought to help.
2. IMPROVES YOUR WORKOUT
How it helps: listening to music during exercise can give you a better workout in several ways. It can increase your endurance, boost your mood and can distract you from any discomfort experienced because, music releases endorphins - our natural 'feel good' hormones that lift our mood and give us motivation to carry on longer with exercise during your workout.
Which type of music is best? The best type of music for exercise is thought to be high energy, high tempo music such as hip hop or dance music.
3. MEMORY LOSS
How it helps: For many people suffering from memory loss the spoken language has become meaningless. Music can help patients remember tunes or songs and get in touch with their history. This is because the part of the brain which processes music is located next to memory. People with memory loss however respond best to music of their choice. LETS GIVE MORE TO MUSICWHY MUSIC IS THE KEY TO GOOD HEALTH
Music can do more than just lifting your spirit:
1. CHRONIC BACK PAIN
Music works on the autonomic nervous system - the part of the nervous system responsible for controlling our blood pressure, heartbeat and brain function - and also the limbic system - the part of the brain that controls feelings and emotions. These systems react sensitively to music.

When slow rhythms are played, our blood pressure and heartbeat slow down which helps us breathe more slowly, thus reducing muscle tension in our neck, shoulders, stomach and back. But also apart from physical tension, music also reduces psychological tension in our mind.

In other words when we feel pain, we become frightened, frustrated and angry which makes us tense up hundreds of muscles in our back. Listening to music on a regular basis helps our bodies relax physically and mentally, thus helping to relieve - and prevent - back pain.
 'Music is an important part of our physical and emotional wellbeing - ever since we were babies in our mother's womb listening to her heartbeat and breathing rhythms. 'Listening to music for about 25 minutes every day for at least ten days can help prevent back pain and also make you sleep better.

Which type of music is best? Any type of classical music can help relieve muscle pain. Calm, slow music is also thought to help.
2. IMPROVES YOUR WORKOUT
How it helps: listening to music during exercise can give you a better workout in several ways. It can increase your endurance, boost your mood and can distract you from any discomfort experienced because, music releases endorphins - our natural 'feel good' hormones that lift our mood and give us motivation to carry on longer with exercise during your workout.
Which type of music is best? The best type of music for exercise is thought to be high energy, high tempo music such as hip hop or dance music.
3. MEMORY LOSS
How it helps: For many people suffering from memory loss the spoken language has become meaningless. Music can help patients remember tunes or songs and get in touch with their history. This is because the part of the brain which processes music is located next to memory. People with memory loss however respond best to music of their choice. LETS GIVE MORE TO MUSIC
                                                               By: Faith Ombathi, C.O.O of E.Y.


Music
Somalis have a Rich Musical Heritage centered on Traditional Somali Folklore. Most Somali songs are Pentatonic; that is, they only use Five Pitches per Octave in contrast to a Heptatonic (Seven note) scale such as the Major scale. At first listen, Somali music might be mistaken for the Sounds of nearby Regions such as Ethiopia, Sudan or Arabia, but it is ultimately Recognizable by its own Unique Tunes and Styles.
Somali songs are usually the product of Collaboration between Lyricists (Midho), Songwriters (Lahan), and Singers ('Codka or "voice"). Native instruments include the Batar drum and the Kaban or oud. Bands such as Waaberi and Horseed have gained a small following outside of the Country. Others, such as Ahmed Cali Cigal and Maryam Mursal, have fused Traditional Somali music with Rock and roll, Bossa nova, Jazz, and other Modern influences.
The first major Form of Modern Somali Music began in the mid-1930s, when Northern Somalia was a part of the British Somaliland Protectorate. This style of Music was known as Xer-Dhaanto, an Innovative, Urban form of Somali folk Dance and Song. This period also saw the Rise of the Xaaji Baal Baal Dance Troupe, which became very influential over the Course of its long Career.
Somali Popular music began with the Balwo style, which was created by Abdi Sinimo. This style began in Dilla, and then spread throughout the Area. It was a Mixture of modern Poetry and Somali dance Music.
Cabdillahi Qarshe rose to Fame in the early 1940s as part of the Qaraami Style. Many Qarami songs from this Era are still Extremely Popular Today. This Musical style is mostly played on the Kaban (oud). The first Somali kaban players were: Ali Feiruz, Mohamed Nahari, and others in 1950s.

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